Hunger in NYC

Nearly 1.4 million New Yorkers face hunger every year, including close to one in four New York City children. The economy may have improved these last several years, but New York’s poverty and unemployment rates remain higher than the national and state averages. For many, income hasn’t kept up with the rising cost of living: 42% of New York City households – 2.7 million men, women and children – lack the income needed to cover basic necessities like food, shelter, transportation, and childcare.

Hunger can be found anywhere in New York City. City Harvest serves seniors whose fixed incomes haven’t kept up with the rising cost of living in the city, and parents choosing between purchasing clothing for their families, paying utility bills and buying groceries. We serve the working mom who has trouble making ends meet by month’s end. When a person or household cannot put good, nutritious meals on the table regularly for all its members, they are considered food insecure.

Hungry men, women, children and seniors made 17.3 million visits to the soup kitchens and food pantries in City Harvest’s network last year. At the same time, more than 60% of residents of poor neighborhoods are obese, and they are three times more likely than residents of wealthy neighborhoods to suffer from diabetes.

[Insert NYC 5 Boroughs Map with these stats (2014)]
Bronx: 18.7% of residents are food insecure (264,910); 25.6% of children are food insecure (94,020).
Brooklyn: 20.0% of residents are food insecure (515,420); 24.6% of children are food insecure (148,550)
Manhattan: 15.1% of residents are food insecure (243,570); 19.0% of children are food insecure (45,200)
Queens: 13.1% of residents are food insecure (298,250); 19.5% of children are food insecure (91,290)
Staten Island: 10.3% of residents are food insecure (48,380); 18.6% of children are food insecure (19,940)

[Links to:]
Neighbors Helping Neighbors (Faces of Hunger)
We are the New York City community’s response to hunger. Read our stories.

Studies and Reports

Stay up-to-date on hunger and poverty in our city.

Include 2014 NYC Self-Sufficiency Standard